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Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

Depression & ANXIETY Treatment in Washington DC

We are glad to offer transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) at The GW Medical Faculty Associates as a treatment of depression and anxiety.

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a noninvasive procedure that stimulates brain cells using magnetic fields to improve symptoms of depression and anxiety. TMS is usually used when other treatments for depression or anxiety such as medications and psychotherapy have failed.

During a TMS session, an electromagnetic coil is placed near your forehead on your scalp. In a painless way, the coil delivers pulses of magnetic fields stimulating brain cells involved in mood control, depression and anxiety.

Because the treatment for depression involves using repetitive pulses for each session, it is called repetitive TMS (rTMS).

What to Expect

TMS sessions are carried out daily for 4-6 weeks. Each session will last for 20-40 minutes. The first session will typically last longer, around 60 minutes, as the physician has to determine the optimal site and the amount of magnetic energy needed for stimulation. This process is called mapping and is usually repeated every 2 weeks.

TMS is well tolerated and safe. However, some patients could experience some side effects.

Common side effects include:

  • Lightheadedness
  • Headache
  • Scalp discomfort
  • Tingling or twitching of the facial muscles

These side effects are usually mild and tend to improve with every subsequent session.

Serious side effects are very uncommon and include seizures, hearing loss (if there is inadequate ear protection during the sessions) and mania (in people with bipolar disorder).

You will need a referral from the physician treating your depression or anxiety and follow-up with the same physician to see if you are benefiting from the treatment.

What You Should Know

Symptom relief may take few weeks of treatment. rTMS is less likely to work if the mental illness includes psychotic symptoms, failure to respond to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and refractory chronic depression that has been lasting for many years.

Contraindications for TMS include the presence of any metallic or medical implanted device close enough to the electromagnetic coil such as aneurysm clips or coils and deep brain stimulators, pregnancy and a history of seizures.

If you suffer from depressive symptoms and are deemed a good candidate for rTMS by your referring physician, we look forward to seeing you in our TMS lab to help you.

Contact Us

Call (202) 741-2417 for more information.

Clinical Trials

  • INSYTE: Management of Parkinson’s Disease Psychosis in Actual Practice (The INSYTE Study)

    The INSYTE Study will examine the current disease progression of Parkinson’s disease Psychosis (PDP), the clinical, economic, and humanistic impact of anti-psychotic therapy in the management of the condition in real-world settings, and the burden of the condition on patients and their caregivers.

  • REFALS:EFFECTS OF ORAL LEVOSIMENDAN (ODM-109) ON RESPIRATORY FUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH ALS

    This study will evaluate whether prolonged oral levosimendan can preserve respiratory function more effectively than placebo, resulting in better patient functionality as measured by the ALSFRS-R scale.

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    The purpose of the PENNANT study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and effectiveness of the study drug (H.P. Acthar Gel®) in slowing the loss of motor skills or brain function in patients with ALS and to assess whether the study drug can increase an ALS patient’s life expectancy. Eligible participants will either receive the study drug or a placebo (inactive drug).

  • Protocol H8H-MC-LAIJ, Randomized Controlled Trial of Lasmiditan Over Four Migraine Attacks
    The objective of this Phase 3 study is to evaluate the efficacy of lasmiditan 200 mg and 100 mg on migraine headache pain freedom compared to placebo.
  • ARISE: pAdsevonil in drug-ResIStant Epilepsy: A RANDOMIZED, DOUBLE-BLIND, PLACEBO-CONTROLLED, DOSE FINDING STUDY TO EVALUATE THE EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF PADSEVONIL AS ADJUNCTIVE TREATMENT OF FOCAL-ONSET SEIZURES IN ADULT SUBJECTS WITH DRUG-RESISTANT EPILEPSY, PHASE 2
    The primary objectives of this study are to characterize the dose-response relationship with respect to efficacy of PSL administered concomitantly with up to 3 anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) for treatment of observable focal-onset seizures in subjects with drug-resistant epilepsy and to evaluate the efficacy of the 4 selected dose regimens of PSL compared with placebo. The secondary objective is to assess the safety and tolerability of all doses of PSL in relation to placebo.
  • A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Phase 2 Study Exploring the Efficacy, Safety, and Tolerability of Natalizumab (BG00002) as Adjunctive Therapy in Adult Subjects With Drug-Resistant Focal Epilepsy
    The primary efficacy objective of the study is to determine if adjunctive therapy of natalizumab 300 mg intravenous (IV) infusion every 4 weeks reduces the frequency of seizures in adult subjects with drug-resistant focal epilepsy.
  • Low frequency electrical stimulation of the fornix in Intractable Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (MTLE)
    To develop a protocol to evaluate the safety and tolerability of low frequency stimulation of the fornix in patients with MTLE.